Showing posts with label gold stars. Show all posts
Showing posts with label gold stars. Show all posts

Friday, October 5, 2007

Gold Star for publisher Bob Buckel

Gold StarsIt's been awhile since I handed out a Gold Star, which is my way to give a little recognition to someone outside the aviation industry who spontaneously demonstrates an appreciation for flight attendants and their work. Today I'm giving a Gold Star to Bob Buckel, who is the publisher of the Azle News (as in Azle, Texas).

Mr. Buckel gets a Gold Star for Smile, and my heart takes flight, an article he wrote in yesterday's Azle News. In his article he talks about jobs he used to have, and jobs he had considered over the course of his life. He has this to say about flight attendants' work:

Pack a couple of hundred people into seats and strap them in. Put some G-forces on them – bounce them around a little – in addition to whatever stresses they brought with them. Serve them some drinks, then point out that their restroom options are very limited.

Crying babies, claustrophobic type-A businessmen late for appointments, spike-haired musicians, talkative teens and people who just don’t quite fit into those seats – it’s not a scene many of us would like to preside over.

The glamour of seeing all these exotic locales dims somewhat when you realize that at most stops, the flight attendants barely make it off the airplane. They’re busy putting up pillows, picking up trash and getting the seats ready for the next crowd of passengers.

Just for the record, I couldn’t carry a tray of drinks around all day on solid ground without dumping it. They do it all day long, along a shifting, narrow aisle – at least they don’t have to wear high heels anymore. And through it all, some of them still manage to smile.
They do indeed! Thanks for writing that, Mr Buckel. In appreciation for your understanding, you get a Gold Star.

Click here to see who else was awarded a gold star.

Thursday, June 14, 2007

Gold Star for Travel Columnist Jeanne Leblanc

From time to time, I award a Gold Star to someone outside the aviation industry who spontaneously demonstrates an appreciation for flight attendants and their work. Today I'm giving a Gold Star to Jeanne Leblanc, who is a travel columnist for the Hartford Courant.

In her blog, Coach Class: Travel for Real People, she wrote a piece titled Flight Attendants on Edge. In it she described the attentive service that she and her husband experienced recently on a KLM flight that was "quite a contrast to what we've been finding on domestic flights of late. But I don't blame U.S. flight attendants."

She goes on:

It's important to remember, though, that most flight attendants employed by U.S. airlines are working harder for less money than ever before. They've watched their jobs get more demanding while their standard of living has fallen. Lately, many are feeling demoralized - and betrayed - by large bonuses for airline executives.

This isn't happening to European flight attendants. One KLM attendant told us that he earns about the same as an American flight attendant while working half as many hours. Not only that, he said, but European carriers tend to have larger crews, so each flight attendant has fewer passengers to serve.

No, that doesn't mean every flight attendant is automatically right all the time. But I think it does mean that we should at least try to extend them some sympathy.
Thanks for writing that, Ms. Leblanc. In appreciation for your understanding, you get a Gold Star.

Saturday, February 17, 2007

Gold Star for Mike Gallagher


Every once in awhile, I award a Gold Star to someone outside the aviation industry who spontaneously demonstrates an appreciation for flight attendants and their work. Today I'm giving a Gold Star to radio talk-show host and Fox News Channel contributor Mike Gallagher for something he wrote in his blog a couple of days ago.

In a piece called Stuck on another airplane... Mr. Gallagher wrote:

Thanks to modern technology and gadgetry, I'm sitting here in my seat on an airplane waiting to take off for the New York City area. Literally as I type these words, an irate woman is yelling at a flight attendant because we've been sitting on the runway here for over an hour.

It's a pretty amazing scene: the flight attendants are huddled together up in the front, trying to figure out what to do with the angry woman. Since we're being held due to weather conditions in the New York area, we're sitting out on the Dallas/Ft Worth tarmac somewhere and I don't really know what they can do about her. I suppose if she REALLY gets out of control, we'll have to be delayed even longer while they put shackles and handcuffs on her and haul her away to airport jail.

I don't mean to make light of someone carrying on like the village idiot on an airplane. It sure isn't the flight attendants' fault, nor is it any of us. I don't think we can blame the pilot since they're being told what to do by the control tower.
Thanks for writing that, Mr. Gallagher. In appreciation for your understanding, you get a Gold Star.

Tuesday, January 16, 2007

Dance of the flight attendant

flight attendantYou perform it again and again, and you probably know it by heart, but have you ever thought of your safety briefing as a kind of dance? Someone has.

Check out Dance of the Flight Attendant by Jen Wang.

I found the link on a blog called Gadling. Let's give that blogger a gold star: Not only did he write about the dance of the flight attendant, apparently he actually pays attention to safety briefings when he flies. He said, "Does anyone (besides me, naturally) pay attention to these demonstrations any more?"