Showing posts with label Asian carriers. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Asian carriers. Show all posts

Wednesday, July 23, 2008

Court orders Philippine Airlines to reinstate 1,400 cabin crew jobs, with back wages

Philippine AirlinesEarlier this week, the Supreme Court (SC) of the Philippines ordered national flag carrier Philippine Airlines (PAL) to reinstate about 1,400 cabin crew who were illegally laid off by the carrier in 1998. The cabin crew jobs were eliminated during the Asian financial crisis, a period when Philippine Airlines was undergoing financial difficulties and labor disputes that led the carrier to temporarily shut down operations. The court decision is seen as a clear victory for the Flight Attendants and Stewards Association of the Philippines (Fasap), which had filed suit against the carrier on behalf of the dismissed cabin crew.

According to an article about the court decision in the Manila Sun-Star, the Supreme Court "granted the petition filed by the Flight Attendants and Stewards Association of the Philippines (Fasap) seeking a reversal of the Court of Appeals (CA) decision upholding PAL's retrenchment program."

The SC sustained the findings of the labor arbiter that found PAL guilty of illegal dismissal and ordered the reinstatement of the dismissed employees, saying the airline failed to comply with certain standards established under the law.

The high court said PAL failed to justify that the retrenchment is necessary and likely to prevent business losses; that the dismissal was done in good faith; and that it used reasonable criteria in ascertaining who would be dismissed and who would be retained among the employees, such as status, efficiency, seniority, physical fitness, age, and financial hardship for certain workers.

According to the SC, PAL initially decided to cut its fleet size to only 14 or "Plan 14," based on which plan, it retrenched more than 1,400 of its cabin crew personnel. However, PAL changed its mind and decided to retain 22 units of aircraft or "Plan 22" but has already retrenched more than what was necessary.

Such move, the court said, is "capricious and arbitrary" and in bad faith considering that more than 1,000 employees who had been working long with PAL lost their jobs, only to be recalled but assigned to lower positions.
The court ruled that PAL acted illegally "because it failed to take into account each cabin attendant's respective service record, thereby disregarding seniority and loyalty in the evaluation of overall employee performance."

The Sun-Star reported that, under the terms of the court decision, PAL is "directed to pay the dismissed employees their full back wages, inclusive of allowances and other benefits computed from the time of their separation up to the time of the actual reinstatement. When reinstatement is no longer feasible, the court ordered PAL to pay the back wages, in lieu of the reinstatement, and separation pay equal to one month's pay for every year of service."

Wednesday, July 16, 2008

All Cathay Pacific cabin crew may now work until age 55

Cathay Pacific AirwaysEffective immediately, all flight attendants at Cathay Pacific Airways will be able to continue working at the airline until they reach the age of 55. Until now, cabin crew who began working for Cathay Pacific after 1993 faced mandatory retirement at age 45. Those hired before 1993 were allowed to work until they became 55. Under the new rule, the same retirement age will apply for all, regardless of hire date. The rule applies to both male and female cabin crew.

The change reflects recent negotiations between the Cathay Pacific Airways Flight Attendants' Union and the airline's management. The rule change will affect the 5,000 cabin crew currently based in Hong Kong, and also will be applied to the 1,500 or so new-hires that Cathay Pacific intends to add to its work force by the end of this year.

Friday, June 27, 2008

Cathay Pacific Airways turbulence incident injures eight

Cathay Pacific Airways A330-300On Thursday, June 26, 2008, eight people on a Cathay Pacific Airways flight were injured when the aircraft encountered severe turbulence during its landing descent. The incident happened when Cathay Pacific Flight CX708 , an Airbus A330-300 with 241 passengers and 12 crew on board, was within minutes of landing at Hong Kong after a scheduled flight from Bangkok.

According to several news reports, five passengers and one flight attendant were treated at Princess Margaret Hospital hospital for minor injuries and released. Two other cabin crew members remained in the hospital with more serious injuries.

An article about the turbulence incident on AviationRecord.com quoted a statement from Cathay Pacific, which said that "Flight CX708 encountered the turbulence when the 'fasten seatbelt' sign had been illuminated about 12 minutes prior to landing." The captain sent a message about the incident, so that ambulances were waiting to transport the injured as soon as the aircraft landed.

[Photo Source]

Monday, June 9, 2008

New designer uniforms for Singapore Airlines male cabin crew

Singapore Airlines male cabin crew uniform tiesWhen Singapore Airlines male cabin crew begin wearing their new designer uniforms later this month, it will not be a hat that makes the man -- it will be the tie. Designed by veteran French fashion designer Christophe Galibert, artistic Director of Balmain Uniformes, the new look features a smart new single-breasted navy blue suit, worn with a sky blue shirt and a striped tie. It is the tie that will distinguish one crew position from another.

The new ties are pictured at right. Each color represents a different crew rank. From left to right:

  • Purple – Inflight Supervisor
  • Red – Chief Steward
  • Green – Leading Steward
  • Blue – Flight Steward
The designer, Mr. Galibert, said, "The entire Balmain team was thrilled to embark on the mission of designing the Singapore Airlines male cabin crew uniform and bringing to it our own international touch.

"In designing this new look, our main aim was to retain the legendary elegance of the Singapore Airlines male cabin crew but at the same time make it more consistent with the iconic creation of Mr Pierre Balmain’s sarong kebaya. Our challenge was, therefore, to find a matching smartness and unique sophistication for the male crew uniform."

Singapore Airlines male cabin crewThe sarong kebaya uniform worn by female cabin crew at Singapore Airlines also is a Balmain design. The colors of the new male cabin crew uniform, including the ties, were chosen to coordinate with the colors of the women's sarong kebaya.

Mr. Tan Pee Teck, Senior Vice President Cabin Crew at Singapore Airlines added, "The new uniform projects a smart and professional image and will instill a sense of pride in the crew. This is even more so since many of our crew members were themselves actively involved in the selection and fine-tuning of the design concept and colour scheme of the uniform."

The current male cabin crew uniform, consisting of grey pants and jackets in several colors, was designed by Lanvin in 1991. Male cabin crew at Singapore Airlines will begin wearing their new designer uniforms on June 30, 2008.

According to Singapore Airlines, the carrier currently employs 7,375 cabin crew members, of which almost 40% are male.

[Photo Source]

Thursday, May 29, 2008

Passenger suicide on Korean Air flight

Korean Air logoAFP News is reporting that cabin crew aboard a Korean Airlines flight discovered the body of a 29-year old woman, hanged in a lavatory shortly before the aircraft, a Boeing 777-200, was due to land at Seoul's Incheon Airport. The incident happened yesterday on a flight between Honolulu and Seoul.

AFP News gave this brief account:

When the passenger failed to return to her seat, a flight attendant checked the toilet where she found the woman hanging from the wall with a scarf around her neck.

She did not respond to emergency medical procedures performed on the plane and was pronounced dead on arrival in hospital.
The victim was reported to be a Japanese national.

Friday, October 26, 2007

Singapore Airlines A380 - What's the cabin like?

The first commercial flight of the world's largest passenger airliner, the double-decker Airbus A380, took place yesterday. For its inaugural flight, Singapore Airlines Flight SQ 380 traveled from Singapore's Changi Airport to Sydney International Airport with 455 passengers and 35 crew on board.

The new Singapore Airlines A380 has two decks with 12 cabins in first class, 60 extra-wide seats in business class, and 399 seats in economy class. If you've been wondering what the interior of the aircraft looks like, here are some videos that will give you an armchair tour.

The first, a two and a half minute video produced by Airbus, shows the A380 cabin interior, including the premium class center aisle seats that convert to double beds:



Next is a four minute promotional video about the A380 from Singapore Airlines:



Thanks to Airbus and Singapore Airlines for providing these videos. For more information about this new aircraft, visit the Airbus A380 Navigator interactive website.

Wednesday, October 17, 2007

History of Cathay Pacific Cabin Crew Uniforms

I've noticed that whenever I post anything in this blog about flight attendant uniforms or flight attendant history, I get a lot of positive feedback from readers. This interesting video addresses both topics, since it reviews the uniforms of Cathay Pacific cabin crew over the past 60 years. I hope you enjoy it.



If the video does not display or play properly above, click here to watch Cathay Pacific Cabin Crew/Flight Attendant Uniforms on YouTube.

Tip of the hat to YouTube user crazyroom06 for posting the video on YouTube.

Tuesday, August 21, 2007

Evacuation of burning China Airlines B737 at Naha, Okinawa

A China Airlines B737 burst into flames at Naha, Okinawa yesterday morning. The aircraft had just arrived on a scheduled flight from Taipei, and passengers were preparing to deplane when the aircraft caught fire. All 157 passengers and eight crew members evacuated the aircraft safely just before it exploded. Congratulations to the cabin crew of China Airlines Flight 120 for managing to evacuate everyone, and with no serious injuries.

China Airlines officials publicly praised the crew, describing them as "heroes," and a spokesman for the Taiwan government's Civil Aeronautics Administration (CAA) said, "Based on the information we have gathered, they evacuated all the passengers in accordance with the standard operation procedure, which requires that all passengers be evacuated within 90 seconds in the case of emergency."

Crew members were identified as You Chien-kuo (captain), Tseng Ta-wei (first officer), cabin chief Kang Li-mei, and flight attendants Cheng Hsieh-jer, Fan Jin-yao, Chang Chia-wen, and Hung Kuan-lin, all from Taiwan. Another flight attendant, a Japanese national, was not identified by name.

From The China Post:

[Captain] You thanked his crew, saying "they immediately evacuated all the passengers upon receiving my order."

"Without them, I would not have the opportunity to stand here to meet you tonight," he said.

You said all he thought about when dealing with the crisis was to make sure that all passengers and crew members were safe.

Only after he saw cabin chief Kang make a safe landing on the ground through an evacuation sliding chute did he order Tseng to quickly get out of the plane.

Television pictures showed Captain You telling the copilot to climb out of the two-story cockpit via rope before doing so himself. Seconds later, the blaze set off a chain of explosions.
This video of the event shows clearly what a close call it was for all those on board:



If the video does not play or display properly here, you can view "China airlines 737 explodes in Okinawa" on YouTube.

Tip of the hat to YouTube user Hobox72 for posting the video.

Tuesday, August 7, 2007

Air India cabin crew to get new designer uniforms

Air India logoEarlier this year India's two main state-owned airlines were merged into one company. The new Air India is undergoing a corporate image makeover, and as a part of that effort, cabin crew and ground personnel will be getting smart new uniforms created by one of India's top fashion designers.

Designer Ritu Beri has been selected to design the new uniforms for India's national flag carrier, according to India's Economic Times:

The design of the new uniforms draw inspiration from the Sun Temple of Konark in Orissa, yet maintains a modern outlook.

The colour palette of the uniform is red, orange, black and white, with red standing for strength and orange for cultural roots.

"The endeavour is to combine our rich Indian colours and motifs from the Sun Temple with the powerful and more modern combination of black and white in the borders," a statement from Air India said.

The uniform for the female employees, both ground staff and cabin crew, would include sarees, tunics, scarves, jackets, coats, aprons and shoes, while there would be specially designed ties for the male staff.
For more information about the designer, visit Ritu Beri's website. While you are there, be sure to have a look at her Uniform Portfolio page.

When a photo of the new uniforms becomes available, I'll post it here on Cabin Crew News.

Tuesday, July 31, 2007

Malaysia Airlines cabin crew win award

Malaysia Airlines cabin crewWhich airline has the world's best cabin crew? According to the results of a recent poll of passengers worldwide, Malaysia Airlines cabin crew were rated number one.

The poll, known as the World Airline Survey, is conducted annually by London-based Skytrax Research. The winners in each category receive a World Airline Award.

A New Straits Times article about the cabin crew award quoted Malaysia Airlines managing director and chief executive officer Datuk Idris Jala, who said he was very proud of the cabin crew and their outstanding performance.

"Our crew treat our customers as guests in our own home. They are natural, spontaneous and willing to demonstrate the best of Malaysian hospitality," said Idris in a statement.
Congratulations to all the Malaysia Airlines cabin staff for winning this award.

[Photo Source]